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David Marr
David Marr

David Marr is the author of Patrick White: A Life, Panic, The High Price of Heaven and Dark Victory (with Marian Wilkinson). He has written for the Sydney Morning Herald, the Age, the Saturday Paper, the Guardian and the Monthly, and been editor of the National Times, a reporter for Four Corners and presenter of ABC TV’s Media Watch. He is the author of five bestselling Quarterly Essays.

By the author

The White Queen: One Nation and the Politics of Race by David Marr
One Nation and the Politics of Race

David Marr looks at Australia’s brand of the politics of resentment now sweeping the world.

 

Quarterly Essay 59: Faction Man
Bill Shorten's Path to Power

Marr's Quarterly Essay profiles of Kevin Rudd and Tony Abbott ignited firestorms of media coverage and were national bestsellers. In Quarterly Essay 59, he turns his enquiring mind toward Bill Shorten. 

Quarterly Essay 51: The Prince
Faith, abuse and George Pell

The Prince is an arresting portrait of faith, loyalty and ambition, set against a backdrop of terrible suffering and an ancient institution in turmoil. 

Quarterly Essay 47: Political Animal
The making of Tony Abbott

David Marr shows that Abbott thrives on chaos and conflict. Part fighter and part charmer, he is deeply religious and deeply political. What happens, then, when his values clash with his need to win?

Quarterly Essay 38: Power Trip
The political journey of Kevin Rudd

Power Trip shows the making of Kevin Rudd, prime minister. In Eumundi, where Rudd was born, David Marr investigates the formative tragedy of his life: the death of his father and what came after. He tracks the transformation of a dreamy kid into an implacably determined youth, already set on the prime ministership. He examines Rudd’s years as Wayne Goss’s right-hand man in Queensland, his relentless work in federal Opposition – from 

Quarterly Essay 26: His Master's Voice
The corruption of public debate under Howard

In His Master's Voice, David Marr investigates both a decade of suppression and the strange willingness of Australians to watch, with such little angst, their liberties drift away.