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Review of Net Loss by Stephanie Trigg, The Conversation

Review of <em> Net Loss </em> by Stephanie Trigg, <em> The Conversation </em>

The essay is a mosaic of cultural allusion that is meaningful precisely because it is held together by the narrative self that analyses and makes these connections.

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Why your most personal moments are too precious for Instagram

Why your most personal moments are too precious for Instagram

Art critic Sebastian Smee has a message for all social media users this Christmas: it's OK to be alone with your own thoughts.

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Review of Net Loss by Alex Tighe, Australian Book Review

Review of <em> Net Loss </em> by Alex Tighe, <em> Australian Book Review </em>

You probably own a smartphone. Chances are it’s in your pocket right now, or at least within arm’s reach – don’t pick it up. Fight the habit.

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Sebastian Smee on Radio National's Life Matters

Sebastian Smee on Radio National's Life Matters

Sebastian Smee on how to protect our tender souls from being obliterated by the internet

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Laura Tingle on 'leadership'

Recent events have left Australians, and indeed the world, wondering what makes a truly good leader. 

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Laura Tingle on The Garret Podcast

Laura Tingle on The Garret Podcast

As a commentator, you've got to think about issues that aren't necessarily immediately in play, you put them in a broader context, you I suppose allow yourself a little more indignation sometimes, or possibly a little bit more compassion.

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How Australia could drift to a 'strongman' leader

How Australia could drift to a 'strongman' leader

While Australia has been dealing with leadership instability, other countries have moved in an increasingly authoritarian direction.

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Laura Tingle on leadership, and political self-indulgence

Laura Tingle on leadership, and political self-indulgence

Australia has changed prime ministers five times in the last decade. Our national leaders have struggled and mostly failed to propose reforms, carry them through, and make them stick. Journalist Laura Tingle is asking the question: what has gone wrong with political leadership in Australia? 

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The Book Pod Ep 2 - 'I Hate The Way We're Played' with Laura Tingle

The Book Pod Ep 2 - 'I Hate The Way We're Played' with Laura Tingle

Join host Corrie Perkin and political journalist and writer Laura Tingle as they discuss Laura's latest Quarterly Essay ‘Follow the Leader – Democracy and the Rise of the Strongman’.

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Getting the people behind the Uluru statement

The essay, Follow the Leader, from my perspective, is ultimately a challenge for those of us who are outside the system to look at ourselves as a fundamental part of the problem in Indigenous affairs. We allow our political leaders to remain comfortably ignorant. And while they are comfortably ignorant, they will fail us as leaders.

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Revealed: Gautam Adani's coal play in the state facing global-warming hell

Revealed: Gautam Adani's coal play in the state facing global-warming hell

The extraction of mammoth coal deposits in Queensland's Galilee Basin will only exacerbate climate change. Who supports the mines - and why?

 

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Anna Krien: Mayor Jenny Hill needs to take a deep breath and consider her legacy

Anna Krien: Mayor Jenny Hill needs to take a deep breath and consider her legacy

I enjoyed meeting the Townsville Mayor Jenny Hill in February this year. I found her a warm and wry person and she struck me as a fighter, someone you’d want in your corner. The problem however, with being such a vocal and determined fighter is that when it comes to the Adani proposed project, Hill — like many others — has boxed herself into a corner.

 

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Pauline Hanson's One Nation 'wouldn't last a week without her', David Marr says

Pauline Hanson's One Nation 'wouldn't last a week without her', David Marr says

Journalist David Marr says he likes Pauline Hanson's voice; he likes it in the way he liked Julia Gillard's voice. It cuts through, it is distinctive.

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David Marr talks Pauline Hanson's appeal and One Nation's ambitions of expanding into Tasmania

For David Marr’s latest Quarterly Essay contribution, the decorated journalist drew on his experience accompanying One Nation leader Pauline Hanson on the campaign trail in Tasmania 20 years ago.

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Politics podcast: David Marr on Pauline Hanson’s star power

In his latest Quarterly Essay, journalist David Marr delves into why Pauline Hanson attracts so much attention. Looking at figures from the last election, Marr also paints a portrait of those voting for One Nation.

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Extract: Looking back, and angry: what drives Pauline Hanson's voters

Extract: Looking back, and angry: what drives Pauline Hanson's voters

In an extract from his new Quarterly Essay, David Marr finds that One Nation voters are richer, more urban and more liberal than you might expect. But they are profoundly nostalgic, display an unusual gloom and share a vehemently anti-government streak

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Extract: David Marr on Pauline Hanson's political dalliance with John Howard

Extract: David Marr on Pauline Hanson's political dalliance with John Howard
David Marr has been watching Pauline Hanson since she first hit the national stage in divisive style in 1996. He reflects on the way the federal MP has unnerved big- and small-I liberals.

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News: Your handy guide to political newspeak

David Marr on how to combat unwelcome ideas about sex, women, human rights and especially race.

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News: Helen Razer on Stan Grant's Australian Dream

‘Like all the world’s most horrific complexes, racism is a difficult thing to describe. You may know it very well when you see it, and, if you’re a person of colour, you will see it vividly and often. But, this does not by necessity mean you can trace its historic origins, or plot the way it is likely to adapt over region and time. This labour is one we must demand from our intellectuals—these are the only people with the time to do it. In a new Quarterly Essay The Australian Dream, journalist Stan Grant obliges. He takes the time to chart a part of that horrific complex as it has played out, and continues to play out, in our nation.’

Read Helen Razer on Stan Grant's Australian Dream in the Daily Review.

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