News & Events

Laura Tingle in conversation with Don Russell

ANU/The Canberra Times Meet the Author series
In-person
Date: Friday, 27 November 6:00 p.m. AEST
RSVP: here


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Laura Tingle in conversation with Niki Savva

Readings
online
Date: Sunday, 29 November 5:00 p.m. AEST
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Laura Tingle in conversation with Corrie Perkin

The Melbourne Press Club
Online
Date: Friday, 4 December 12:30 p.m. AEST
Tickets: members free, non-members and guests $15
RSVP: here


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Laura Tingle in conversation with Anne Tiernan

Avid Reader
ZOOM Online
Date: Friday, 4 December 6:30 p.m. AEST
Tickets: $5.00, Quarterly Essay 80 $24.99
Book: here


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Laura Tingle in conversation with David Marr

Gleebooks
online and in-person
Date: Sunday, 6 December 3:30 p.m. AEST
Tickets in-person: full price $12, concession $9, Gleeclub free. Online: free 
RSVP: here


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Laura Tingle in conversation with Ben Oquist

The Australia Institute
online
Date: Wednesday, 9 December 10:00 a.m. AEST
free 
RSVP: here


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Judith Brett on 7am

Judith Brett on 7am

Australia’s economy is at a crossroads. Its current dependence on coal has its roots in a model built on wool exports, and it needs to change.

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Judith Brett on ABC's The Drum

Judith Brett on ABC's The Drum

The panel discuss the spike of coronavirus cases in Victoria, COVID-19 and the Australian psyche, challenges faced by the rest of the world with the coronavirus pandemic, and our countries' reliance on the coal industry.

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Judith Brett on RN Breakfast

Judith Brett on RN Breakfast

As the Federal Government plans Australia's post-covid economic recovery, it looks like fossil fuels could play a key role.

That would be a mistake, according to the author of the latest Quarterly Essay, which argues Australia's long reliance on simple exports like wool, and more recently coal, is partially to blame for our failure to develop a thriving manufacturing sector.

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Judith Brett on Tripl J “The Grapevine”

Judith Brett on Tripl J “The Grapevine”

Dylan and Kulja talk to Judith Brett about Quarterly Essay ‘The Coal Curse: Resources, Climate, and Australia’s Future’, and more.

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CRY ME A RIVER review in The Australian

CRY ME A RIVER review in The Australian

The Murray-Darling Basin is often in the news and seldom for the right reasons. It is troubled by drought and climate change and the unquenchable thirst of agriculture. Yet belief in it is an article of faith for politicians, causing regular scraps over its management and its future.

In Cry Me A River, journalist and author Margaret Simons chronicles the results of her decision to take a close look at it herself. As she writes, except in times of drought, the Murray-Darling Basin “is a mighty thing”. It covers more than a million square kilometres and encompasses 77,000km of rivers, 2.6 million people, 40 Aboriginal nations and 120 species of waterbirds.

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Margaret Simons on Big Ideas

Margaret Simons on Big Ideas

The Murray Darling Basin covers 4 states. The water from it is the life source for millions of people, their communities, crops, and the natural environment. But it has been in poor shape for a long time. Margaret Simons travelled through the basin - our food and fibre bowl - talking to locals, irrigators, bureaucrats, and scientists, to get the lowdown. She spoke to Paul Barclay.

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Margaret Simons on The Readings Podcast

Margaret Simons on The Readings Podcast

Margaret Simons chats with author Don Watson about her new Quarterly Essay: Cry Me A River - The Tragedy of the Murray-Darling Basin. This conversation was recorded online during the Covid-19 crisis.

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Margaret Simons on Late Night Live

Margaret Simons on Late Night Live

Between fish kills, state rivalries, drought and climate change, the Murray-Darling Basin is a mess. So how have we gotten it so wrong, for so long, and will we ever be able to get it right?

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Peter Hartcher on ABC Radio National

Peter Hartcher on ABC Radio National

China has accused some Australian politicians of hysteria in their response to claims that Beijing tried to plant a spy in the Federal Parliament.

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Peter Hartcher on ABC 7.30

Peter Hartcher on ABC 7.30

 

This week Peter Hartcher, the international editor of The Sydney Morning Herald, is releasing a Quarterly Essay called Red Flag about China's attempts to garner influence in Australia, and how our government should respond to it.

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Peter Hartcher on 7am Podcast

Peter Hartcher on 7am Podcast

Xi Jinping’s ambitions for China are paranoid and expansionist. His mindset mirrors that of the guerrilla fighters in the Chinese Civil War.

 

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Peter Hartcher in The Sydney Morning Herald “Power and Paranoia: Why the Chinese government aggressively pushes beyond its borders”

Peter Hartcher in The Sydney Morning Herald “Power and Paranoia: Why the Chinese government aggressively pushes beyond its borders”

Chinese government-backed patriots living in Australia are aggressively pursuing their homeland’s geopolitical agenda. The good news: new laws help address this. The bad news: they’re not being enforced.

 

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